Law Day Lesson Plans
Grade Lesson Plan
First Grade Rules, Rules, Rules
This activity helps students understand the need for rules, the rule-making process, and the role of the student/citizen. The classroom constitution provides a foundation for understanding and reinforcing the principles and ideals which provide the framework for American democracy. Access Lesson Plan.
First Grade Superhero Citizens
Learning objective: The students will be able to identify characteristics of good citizenship in a community, explain and describe positive actions that represent citizenship in a community, and be able to link good citizenship to their own positive behavior. Access Lesson Plan
Second Grade Rules, Rules, Rules
This activity helps students understand the need for rules, the rule-making process, and the role of the student / citizen. The classroom constitution provides a foundation for understanding and reinforcing the principles and ideals which provide the framework for American democracy. Access Lesson Plan.
Second Grade Conflict Resolution
Objectives: To help classmates have a way to solve problems without always needing the teacher. To help have responsible children help other children in the class by giving solutions to problems. Access Lesson Plan
Third Grade Rules, Rules, Rules
This activity helps students understand the need for rules, the rule-making process, and the role of the student / citizen. The classroom constitution provides a foundation for understanding and reinforcing the principles and ideals which provide the framework for American democracy.  Access Lesson Plan.
Third Grade The Government of Michigan
Multi-lesson unit about state government in Michigan, including how the judicial branch of government resolves conflict. Access Lesson Plan.
Fourth Grade Goldilocks v the Three Bears
This scripted mock trial includes ideas for pre- and post-mock trial activities. Access Lesson Plan.
Fourth Grade Cause and Effect: The Montgomery Bus Boycott
Students will be able to explain the effects of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Access Lesson Plan.
Fifth Grade The Invaders: A Constitutional Rights Activity
Introduces students to the rights guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution. Access Lesson Plan.
Fifth Grade Goldilocks v the Three Bears
This scripted mock trial includes ideas for pre- and post-mock trial activities. Access Lesson Plan.
Fifth Grade Immigration: Ellis Island
Students will be able to understand the process for immigrants traveling through Ellis Island into the United States. Access Lesson Plan
Sixth Grade Becoming a Voter
In this lesson, students apply what they learn about their state’s requirements for registering to vote. Students learn when and how to register, how to complete a voter registration form, and when and how to reregister. Access Lesson Plan.
Sixth Grade Goldilocks vs. the Three Bears
This scripted mock trial includes ideas for pre- and post-mock trial activities. Access Lesson Plan.
Sixth Grade Sixth Amendment for Sixth grade
The goal of this activity is to introduce sixth grade students to the Sixth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution (guarantee of an impartial jury for criminal defendants). The materials illustrate how the American juror selection process differs from the jury selection process used in ancient times during the Roman Republic. The topic is intended to complement the sixth grade social studies focus on world history. Access Lesson Plan.  
Sixth Grade A Civil Conversation
Our pluralistic democracy is based on a set of common principles such as justice, equality, and liberty. These general principles are often interpreted quite differently in specific situations by individuals. Controversial legal and policy issues, as they are discussed in the public arena, often lead to polarization, not understanding. This civil conversation activity offers an alternative. In this structured discussion method, under the guidance of a facilitator, participants are encouraged to engage intellectually with challenging materials, gain insight about their own point of view and strive for a shared understanding of issues. Access Lesson Plan.
Sixth Grade Let’s Meet The Renaissance!
This question is open for discussion, research, and rebuttal: Should the Renaissance be viewed as a time period of discovery, creativity, and reawakening of mankind (and womankind’s) higher mental facilities, or should it be characterized as an age of greed, opportunity, scandal and pretentiousness?  Access Lesson Plan
Seventh Grade First Amendment for Seventh grade
The goal of this activity is to introduce seventh grade students to the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Access Lesson Plan.
Seventh Grade A Civil Conversation
Our pluralistic democracy is based on a set of common principles such as justice, equality, and liberty. These general principles are often interpreted quite differently in specific situations by individuals. Controversial legal and policy issues, as they are discussed in the public arena, often lead to polarization, not understanding. This civil conversation activity offers an alternative. In this structured discussion method, under the guidance of a facilitator, participants are encouraged to engage intellectually with challenging materials, gain insight about their own point of view and strive for a shared understanding of issues.  Access Lesson Plan.
Seventh Grade Abolition of Slavery
Students will learn the history of the abolition movement in the United States. Students will learn to analyze documents for key media literacy concepts relating to audience, authorship, and representation. Students will reflect on how arguments for and against slavery were depicted in the media of the time. Access Lesson Plan.
Eighth Grade Fourteenth Amendment for eighth grade
The goal of this activity is to introduce eighth grade students to the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution (equal protection under the law). Access Lesson Plan.
Eighth Grade A Civil Conversation
Our pluralistic democracy is based on a set of common principles such as justice, equality, and liberty. These general principles are often interpreted quite differently in specific situations by individuals. Controversial legal and policy issues, as they are discussed in the public arena, often lead to polarization, not understanding. This civil conversation activity offers an alternative. In this structured discussion method, under the guidance of a facilitator, participants are encouraged to engage intellectually with challenging materials, gain insight about their own point of view and strive for a shared understanding of issues.  Access Lesson Plan.
Eighth Grade Working for Peace, Working for Justice
Students will learn about five peacemakers in U.S. history: Dekanawidah – the Great Peacemaker, Henry David Thoreau, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King Jr. and Dolored Huerta. Students will learn to analyze media documents for key media literacy concepts relating to audience, authorship, message, and representation. Students will reflect on how efforts for peace and for social justice have intersected in U.S. antiwar movements.  Access Lesson Plan.
Eighth Grade Abolition of Slavery
Students will learn the history of the abolition movement in the United States. Students will learn to analyze documents for key media literacy concepts relating to audience, authorship, and representation. Students will reflect on how arguments for and against slavery were depicted in the media of the time.  Access Lesson Plan.
Ninth Grade The American Jury: A Voir Dire Simulation
Students participate in a simulation of the jury selection process. Access Lesson Plan.
Ninth Grade Fourth Amendment for high school
James Madison drafted the Bill of Rights in 1789 and it was adopted by the states in 1791. He is called the “father” of the Constitution. The Bill of Rights was created because our country’s founding leaders were afraid the government would have too much power. They wanted to be certain that particular, important rights were explicitly stated and protected. Access Lesson Plan.
Ninth Grade Analyzing the Theme of Freedom in Three Speeches
Students define freedom based on three freedom-themed speeches and make an argument about a current political topic referencing their definition and citations from the speeches. Access Lesson Plan.
Ninth Grade Abolition of Slavery
Students will learn the history of the abolition movement in the United States. Students will learn to analyze documents for key media literacy concepts relating to audience, authorship, and representation. Students will reflect on how arguments for and against slavery were depicted in the media of the time.  Access Lesson Plan.
Tenth Grade The American Jury: A Voir Dire Simulation
Students participate in a simulation of the jury selection process.  Access Lesson Plan.
Tenth Grade Can Tolerance Be Taught?
This lesson plan will work to improve these skills: to improve speaking skills by using video as a basis for discussion, to practice both oral and aural skills through the exploitation and exploration of video, and these values: assimilation (immigration issues), patriotism, honesty, justice, friendship, and tolerance.  Access Lesson Plan.
Tenth Grade Abolition of Slavery
Students will learn the history of the abolition movement in the United States. Students will learn to analyze documents for key media literacy concepts relating to audience, authorship, and representation. Students will reflect on how arguments for and against slavery were depicted in the media of the time.  Access Lesson Plan.
Eleventh Grade Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: A Lesson on the Declaration of Independence
This lesson is designed for a 60-minute class period. Extension activities are included at the end of the lesson. Students will be able to: understand the meaning and central ideas of the Declaration of Independence; cite textual evidence to analyze this primary source; and analyze the structure of the document.  Access Lesson Plan.
Eleventh Grade How Does Government Secure Natural Rights?
This lesson introduces you to some basic ideas the Framers used in creating the kind of government they thought would best protect the natural rights of each individual and promote the good of all.  When you finish this lesson you should understand the difference between limited and unlimited government, the difference between written and unwritten constitutions, and how Americans have used the term constitutional government. You should be able to explain why a government with a constitution is not necessarily a constitutional government, and be able to identify alternative models of government that the Founders had to choose from.  Access Lesson Plan.
Eleventh Grade Analyzing the Speeches of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass
By creating a newscast or playing the role of friends discussing an upcoming election, students analyze speeches in order to identify the speaker’s purpose and explore how style and content advance that purpose.  Access Lesson Plan.
 
Eleventh Grade Can Tolerance Be Taught?
This lesson plan will work to improve these skills: to improve speaking skills by using video as a basis for discussion, to practice both oral and aural skills through the exploitation and exploration of video, and these values: assimilation (immigration issues), patriotism, honesty, justice, friendship, and tolerance.  Access Lesson Plan.
Twelfth Grade Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: A Lesson on the Declaration of Independence
This lesson is designed for a 60-minute class period. Extension activities are included at the end of the lesson. Students will be able to: understand the meaning and central ideas of the Declaration of Independence; cite textual evidence to analyze this primary source; and analyze the structure of the document.  Access Lesson Plan.
Twelfth Grade What Conflicting Opinions Did the Framers Have about the Completed Constitution?
This lesson describes some conflicting points of view of leading Framers about the Constitution. Most of the delegates argued for the adoption of the Constitution, although many had reservations about all or parts of it. The reservations of three were so serious that they refused to sign the document. The position of one of these Framers, George Mason, is explored in detail. You also will examine Benjamin Franklin's statement in defense of the Constitution. When you have completed this lesson, you should be able to explain the positions of Franklin and Mason, and give arguments in support of and in opposition to these positions.  Access Lesson Plan.
Twelfth Grade Champion of American History (A Playoff)
In this two-day lesson plan, students will first discuss the qualities and criteria that make for the most important American Historical figure. Students will draw a historical figure out of a hat and then spend the remainder of class period researching sixteen major facts to support their figure as the “Champion of American History.” Day two will be spent as a playoff in front of the class to see who is the “Champion of American History.” Access Lesson Plan.
Twelfth Grade Can Tolerance Be Taught?
This lesson plan will work to improve these skills: to improve speaking skills by using video as a basis for discussion, to practice both oral and aural skills through the exploitation and exploration of video, and these values: assimilation (immigration issues), patriotism, honesty, justice, friendship, and tolerance.  Access Lesson Plan.